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Whenever we walk on the Earth, we should pay attention to what is going on. Too often our minds are somewhere else, thinking about the past or thinking about the future. When we do this, we are missing important lessons. The Earth is a constant flow of lessons and teachings, which also include a constant flow of positive feelings. If we are aware as we walk, we will gather words for our lives, the lessons to help our children; we will gather feelings of interconnectedness and calmness. When we experience this, we should say or think thoughts of gratitude. When we do this, the next person to walk on the sacred path will benefit even more.


Ah key chee ta-keyn-we cha you oh nee huh pay =
HONOR THE VETERANS!
(Lakota)

Almighty, Everlasting God, the Protector of all those who put their trust in Thee: hear our prayers in behalf of Thy servants who sail their vessels beneath the seas.

We beseech Thee to keep in Thy sustaining care all who are in submarines, that they may be delivered from the hidden dangers of the deep.

Grant them courage, and a devotion to fulfill their duties, that they may better serve Thee and their native land.

Though acquainted with the depths of the ocean, deliver them from the depths of despair and the dark hours of the absence of friendliness and grant them a good ship's spirit.

Bless all their kindred and loved ones from whom they are separated.

When they surface their ships, may they praise Thee for Thou art there as well as in the deep.

Fill them with Thy Spirit that they may be sure in their reckonings, unwavering in duty, high in purpose, and upholding the honor of their nation.

Amen

the submariner's prayer -
author unknown


Whenever we walk on the Earth, we should pay attention to what is going on. Too often our minds are somewhere else, thinking about the past or thinking about the future. When we do this, we are missing important lessons. The Earth is a constant flow of lessons and learnings which also include a constant flow of positive feelings. If we are aware as we walk, we will gather words for our lives, the lessons to help our children; we will gather feelings of interconnectedness and calmness. When we experience this, we should say or think thoughts of gratitude. When we do this, the next person to walk on the sacred path will benefit even more.


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Code Talkers / Extra Offerings
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Comanche Codetalkers


Choctaw Code Talkers - 1919 (WWI)

Use of the Native Indian Tongue for Secure Communications
Extracted from OCMH Study 57, Military-Connected Contributions of American Indians to the Culture Heritage of the Nation, Prepared by William Gardner Bell

Secure and rapid communications are essential to effective operation on the battlefield, and military forces are working constantly to develop communications systems, methods, and techniques which will insure that an enemy does not gain access to friendly intentions. While , cryptography is one of the standard means of maintaining security, it takes time--a critical element in military operations--to encode and decode messages from prearranged codes, and codes are subject to being broken. The most desirable method is direct and open on-the-spot transmission by voice over telephone or radio, and such a procedure must recognize that the enemy is always listening in.

To confound the enemy, American forces in both World Wars used Indian personnel and their unique languages to insure secure communications. In World War I in France, the 142d Infantry Regiment had a company of Indians who spoke 26 different languages or dialects, only four or five of which had been reduced to writing. Two Indian officers were selected to supervise a communications system staffed by Choctaw Indians. They were used in the regiment's operations in October 1918, in the Chufilly-Chardeny zone, transmitting in their native tongue a variety of open. voice messages, relating to unit movements, which the enemy, who was completely surprised in the action, obviously could not break.

In World War II in both major theaters of war, the U. S. Army used Indians in its signal communications operations. A group of 24 Navajos was assembled to handle telephone communications, using voice codes in their native tongue, between the Air Commander in the Solomon Islands and various airfields in the region. The U. S. Marine Corps also used Navajo code talkers extensively in the Pacific Theater. And in Europe, the 4th Signal Company of the Army's 4th Infantry Division was assigned 16 Comanches for employment as voice radio operators to transmit and receive messages in their own unwritten language.

The Armed Services ran special training courses both in the United States and in the operational theaters to instruct Indians in the basic communications techniques and to develop standard military phraseology and common military terms for the languages and dialects where such words may never have existed. The success of the experiment in using Indian code talkers is attested to in the reports of military units and commanders in the several services.

For further reading:
Indians in the War. U. S. Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs, Chicago, November 1945.



Navajo Code Talkers - 1943
Corporal Henry Bahe, Jr. (left) and Private First Class George H. Kirk, Navajos serving with a Marine Signal Unit, operate a portable radio set in a clearing they've hacked in the dense jungle close behind the front lines.


Examples from Navajo Code Talkers' Dictionary
TORPEDO / LO-BE-CA = FISH SHELL
CONDITION / AH-HO-TAI = HOW IT IS
BATTLESHIP / LO-TSO = WHALE
RUSSIA / SILA-GOL-CHI-IH = RED ARMY
COLONEL / ATSAH-BESH-LE-GAI = SILVER EAGLE
ROUTE / GAH-BIH-TKEEN / RABBIT TRAIL
BRITAIN / TOH-TA / BETWEEN WATERS
DIVE BOMBER / GINI / CHICKEN HAWK
TANK DESTROYER / CHAY-DA-GAHI-NAIL-TSAIDI / TORTOISE KILLER
CORPS / DIN-NEH-IH / CLAN

...more to come!



EXTRA OFFERINGS...

THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS

'Twas the night before Christmas, he lived all alone,
In a one bedroom house made of plaster and stone.
I had come down the chimney with presents to give,
And to see whom in this home did actually live.

I looked all about, a strange sight I did see,
No tinsel, no presents, not even a tree.
No stockings by mantle, just boots filled with sand,
On the wall hung pictures of far distant lands.

With medals and badges, awards of all kinds,
A sober thought came through my mind.
For this house was different, it was dark and dreary,
I found the home of a soldier, once I could see clearly.

The soldier lay sleeping, silent, alone,
Curled up on the floor in the one bedroom home.
The face was so gentle, the room in such disorder,
Not how I pictured a United States soldier.

Was this the hero of whom I'd just read?
Curled up on a poncho, the floor for a bed?
I realized the families that I saw this night,
Owed their lives to these soldiers who were willing to fight.

Soon 'round the world, the children would play,
And grownups would celebrate a bright Christmas day.
They all enjoyed freedom, each month of the year,
Because of these soldiers, like the one lying here.

I couldn't help but wonder, how many lay alone,
On a cold Christmas eve, in a land far from home.
The very thought brought a tear to my eye,
I dropped to my knees and I started to cry.

The soldier awakened and I heard a rough voice,
Santa, don't cry, this life is my choice.

I fight for freedom, I don't ask for more,
My life is my God, my country, my corps.
The soldier rolled over and drifted to sleep,
I couldn't control it, I continued to weep.

I kept watch for hours, silent and still,
And we both shivered from the cold night's chill.
I didn't want to leave on that dark, cold night,
This guardian of honor, so willing to fight.

Then the soldier rolled over, with a voice soft and pure,
Whispered, Carry on Santa, it's Christmas Day, all is secure.
One look at my watch and I knew he was right,
Merry Christmas my friend, and to all a good night.


 
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