*WHY HAM RADIO IS STILL MAKING NEWS

*HONORING FRED JONES, WA4SWF

*NAVY - MARINE CORPS MARS PROGRAM TO END

*DO YOU WANT TO BE A HAM RADIO OPERATOR

*GREAT HAM RADIO OPERATOR

*NET PREAMBLE AND MORE

*AMERICAN LEGION HAM RADIO CLUB

*HOW SOARA-ARES WAS STARTED

*OPERATING YOUR HAM RADIO

*SILENT KEYS

*HOME

CHECK CALENDAR FOR EVENTS

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Ohio Valley ARES/RACES Net Every Thursday at 8:30 P.M. Repeater 146.610, alternate repeater is 146.715 both repeaters have tones of 103.5. Check both repeaters to find the net.


NEXT SOARA -- ARES MEETING WILL BE THE THIRD MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH. EMA ROOM 515 PARK AVE IRONTON OH. AT 7:00 P.M. VE TESTING AT 6:00 P.M.

October 2018
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SOARA -- ARES MEMBERS

PIO & Webmaster WN8F OK to e-mai me l from here:
Ken Massie
N8TVO:
James Rowe
K8UHN:
Eric Kuhn
N8LRO:
Arthur J. Pierson
W8AFX:
Steve Sheers
N8LCA:
Bill Parsons
KC8WDR:
Harry Rice
KC8VYE:
Chad Thompson
KD8FPX:
Joseph Thompson
KD8FPW:
Mary Thompson
WA4SWF:
Fred Jones
KI4AGR:
Don Canterberry
WW8O:
Gary Stephenson
WM8O:
Wanda Stephenson
W8GMS:
Georgia Sheers
KC8WDS:
Catherine Rice
WN8H:
Mike Nimmo
W8DUQ:
Gregory Hendry
KB9ORD:
Ralph Tuley
WB8YKS:
Mike Love
KB8GWL:
Larry Jewell
N8YN:
Jerry Huffman
KD8LEQ:
Pat Little
KB8RZP:
Gregory Priddy
KE4US:
Bud Preece
KD8NYN:
David Bruce
KD8OMC:
Angie Little
W8HIC:
Jerry Lockhart
KD8RRZ:
Kenny Fields, Jr.
AC8JV:
Matthew Delong
AC8RS:
Matt Marks
AC8VQ:
Tim Nicely
KD8VRU:
Randy Franz
KK4PPJ:
James Miller
KD8WFP:
James (Jay) Boggs
KD8WMV:
Richard (Corey) Watson
KB8LWZ:
Mike (David) Barber
KB8LSR:
Jim Perry
WD8AGH:
Fred Herr
N8URU:
Eddie Jenkins
KB8TGI:
Annabelle Jenkins
N4REN:
James (REN) Reneau
KB8AAK:
RUSSELL JETT
KE8DYD:
LARRY MURRAY, JR
KE8EON:
JIM CURLEY
KC4GST:
Darrell Short
N8DKB:
Keith Brooks
KK4SPW:
Larry Jackson
KE8FSY:
Richard Russell
KM4ZXC:
Christopher Wilson
N8PSA:
Randy Friend

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WHY HAM RADIO IS STILL MAKING NEWS


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SOARA OPERATES FOR EMERGENCY SERVICE

Why is ham radio (or amateur radio) making the news so regularly? Because amateur radio is much more than a hobby. It's a community service!

Amateur radio operators are trained in radio communications. All hams receive training in the use of radio communication technology and operating procedures.

A ham radio operator's special training is the reason why hams regularly take part in community events, sports events and, even emergencies of all kinds where competent and reliable radio communication services are required.

Competence alone does not make amateur radio expertise in demand. The demand might also have something to do with the fact that their services are free!

But "pricing" has no bearing on hams' availability when the time comes to answer the "call of duty". Amateur radio contribution to the safety of their fellow citizens in times of emergency is priceless and always readily available.

Events such as floods, severe weather, major accidents, environmental disasters ... the list of emergency situations is endless, and amateur radio operators' desire and ability to serve is boundless.

Incidentally, public service is the major reason behind a ham radio license immense privileges.

We readily serve, not only when called upon, but often before authorities get around to ask, we are already at work helping save lives and property.

That's why we make ham radio news regularly. Because we are very much part of life in our communities.

We take communication for granted because if we want to talk to someone we have multiple ways of contacting them: home phones, cell phones, email, and instant messaging. We are used to instant gratification by calling or texting and pretty much getting an immediate response from virtually everyone on our contact list. But after all the electronic infrastructure is gone, how will we get in contact with people? Cell phones, landlines, and the internet will be useless. However there are multiple radio options. Which ones will be of the best use and which ones will be basically useless?

General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS), Family Radio Service (FRS) and Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS) use basic handheld radios that are available commercially with pre-programmed frequencies. The person responsible for the GMRS radio must be licensed by the FCC, while FRS and MURS users do not require a license. These are all basically high end walkie talkies. The upside: easy to use, inexpensive and requires no training. The down side: there are only 23 channels on GMRS, 14 on FRS and 5 on MURS and when all other forms of communications are unavailable they will be overloaded and basically useless. Another drawback is that they are basically line of site communication only. In other words, you will have to be very close to who you want to speak to for them to hear you.

Citizen Band (CB) is a step up from the previously mentioned radio communication possibilities. CB radio is easy to use and requires no training or license. CB allows communication on 40 pre-programmed frequencies. Like the other radio options the major problem is with the limited number of frequencies, they will be overloaded. Range is also limited to around 2 to 5 miles.

The GMRS, FRS, and MURS systems are only useful for small groups to communicate with each other while they are in proximity of each other. They are not useful to communicate with other groups or people outside your immediate area. CB radio falls in the same category. Other forms of radio communications which are utilized by police, fire, EMS and military require outside equipment such as repeaters and infrastructure to operate properly. In other words the radio is rather useless without the other equipment that you have no control over (or might not be able to acquire).

Amateur Radio (Ham) provides users with the most versatility when considering post SHTF (SURVIVAL)communication scenarios. The positive aspects of Ham radio are many: there are no pre-programmed frequencies, a Ham operator can program the frequencies of their choice. Sure in a functioning government you may only transmit on certain frequencies but after T-SHTF an experienced Ham operator may use any frequency they wish. Other pros: range is unlimited, many Ham operators contact people around the world and you can pick up weather channels and short wave frequencies. The downside: an FCC license is needed, users much pass a written test to prove they are worthy. Additionally equipment is more expensive.

You may be thinking that you won’t need a license if T-SHTF, and that you’ll just buy a Ham radio and use it when the time comes. You can do that but like other survival skills you need to practice in order to be proficient. You will need experience in the use of the radio, building antennas, Morse Code and fine tuning of frequencies. By getting an Amateur Radio License you can also network with other Hams and become familiar with “Best practices” in Ham operation. Hams are well versed in making home made antennas that work better then commercial antennas and even building radios. These are skills that can be learned but it does take time.

A Ham radio operator can function effectively without the use of any other equipment, even though operators do frequently use repeaters on a day to day basis. Another great aspect of Ham radio is this: you can do more then use voice communication. Morse Code is a common form of communication in Ham radio. Also operators commonly utilize “packet radio”. Packet radio allows transmission of photos, video, and text. The text was the predecessor to email. Yes indeed, Ham radio operators were using email before you were and all these forms of communications are available with just a radio.

Ham radios are versatile and can be base stations located in your home with high output power, mobile mounted in a vehicle with moderate output power, or portable small handheld radios with low power output that can be carried anywhere.

After T-SHTF communication will be difficult but needed. Land lines, cell phones, email, instant messaging, and the internet will be lost but Ham Radio will still be there. When natural disasters like Katrina or Sandy strike, Ham Radio is there to allow emergency personnel to communicate because the normal communications channels are lost. When the government can’t communicate with each other during disaster, who do they call for help? Amateur radio operators, because they know amateur radio is there and works when all other forms of communications fail. That leads me to believe that after T-SHTF, Ham Radio will be the only form of communication available.

When all other communications fail, Ham Radio (Amateur Radio) continues to be operating.

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PHOTOS FROM OUR LAST CHRISTMAS PARTY -- MEETING


Scott Yonally, N8SY Ohio Section Manager presenting a certificate making Southern Ohio Amateur Radio Association a ARRL ARES affiliated club to Jim Rowe, N8TVO SOARA President.


ARRL AFFILIATED CLUB CERTIFICATE TO SOUTHERN OHIO AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION.


Jeff Slattery, N8SUZ District Emergency Coordinator -- Scott Yonally, N8SY Ohio Section Manager.


Michael Love, WB8YKS ARES PIO -- Ken Massie, WN8F former ARES PIO.


MICHAEL LOVE, WB8YKS and SCOTT YONALLY, N8SY


Eddie Jenkins, N8URU, Jeff Gaskins, N8SDY, Annabelle Jenkins, KB8TGI http://www.orgsites.com/oh/soaraares/_Gmanager.html?PGE=y


JIM KE8EON, REN N4REN, JERRY, W8HIC, RHONDA, KE8BCO



 
1210 Visitors  WHY HAM RADIO IS STILL MAKING NEWS

| HONORING FRED JONES, WA4SWF

| NAVY - MARINE CORPS MARS PROGRAM TO END

| DO YOU WANT TO BE A HAM RADIO OPERATOR

| GREAT HAM RADIO OPERATOR

| NET PREAMBLE AND MORE


AMERICAN LEGION HAM RADIO CLUB

| HOW SOARA-ARES WAS STARTED

| OPERATING YOUR HAM RADIO

| SILENT KEYS

| HOME | WRITE US


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