*DO YOU WANT TO BE A HAM RADIO OPERATOR - HOW TO GET A LICENSE
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Ohio Valley ARES/RACES Net Every Thursday at 8:30 P.M. Repeater 146.610, alternate repeater is 146.715 both repeaters have tones of 103.5. Check both repeaters to find the net.


NEXT SOARA -- ARES MEETING WILL BE OCTOBER 16, 2017. AT 7:00 P.M. -- VE TESTING AT 6:00 P.M.

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Tri-State two meter net meets daily Mon - Fri at 7:30 P.M. on repeater 146.940 tone 107.2



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SOARA -- ARES MEMBERS

PIO & Webmaster WN8F OK to e-mai me l from here:
Ken Massie
N8TVO:
James Rowe
K8UHN:
Eric Kuhn
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Arthur J. Pierson
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Steve Sheers
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Bill Parsons
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Harry Rice
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Chad Thompson
KD8FPX:
Joseph Thompson
KD8FPW:
Mary Thompson
WA4SWF:
Fred Jones
KI4AGR:
Don Canterberry
WW8O:
Gary Stephenson
WM8O:
Wanda Stephenson
W8GMS:
Georgia Sheers
KC8WDS:
Catherine Rice
WN8H:
Mike Nimmo
W8DUQ:
Gregory Hendry
KB9ORD:
Ralph Tuley
WB8YKS:
Mike Love
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Larry Jewell
N8YN:
Jerry Huffman
KD8LEQ:
Pat Little
KB8RZP:
Gregory Priddy
KE4US:
Bud Preece
KD8NYN:
David Bruce
KD8OMC:
Angie Little
W8HIC:
Jerry Lockhart
KD8RRZ:
Kenny Fields, Jr.
AC8JV:
Matthew Delong
AC8RS:
Matt Marks
AC8VQ:
Tim Nicely
KD8VRU:
Randy Franz
KK4PPJ:
James Miller
KD8WFP:
James (Jay) Boggs
KD8WMV:
Richard (Corey) Watson
KB8LWZ:
Mike (David) Barber
KB8LSR:
Jim Perry
WD8AGH:
Fred Herr
N8URU:
Eddie Jenkins
KB8TGI:
Annabelle Jenkins
N4REN:
James (REN) Reneau
KB8AAK:
RUSSELL JETT
KE8DYD:
LARRY MURRAY, JR
KE8EON:
JIM CURLEY
KC4GST:
Darrell Short
N8DKB:
Keith Brooks
KK4SPW:
Larry Jackson
KE8FSY:
Richard Russell
KM4ZXC:
Christopher Wilson
N8PSA:
Randy Friend

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DO YOU WANT TO BE A HAM RADIO OPERATOR - HOW TO GET A LICENSE
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SOUTHERN OHIO AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION (SOARA)

AMATEUR RADIO EMERGENCY SERVICE (ARES)


First of all, welcome to ham radio and congratulations on passing your Technician license test! Or maybe you had a technician license and upgraded to the general or extra class license, congratulations. If you don't have a license and want to be a ham radio operator, this page has a lot of information on how you can get an FCC license. Also, this page is designed to help you learn how we communicate via ham radio. The second section has suggestions on how to be a great ham radio operator. Starting with DO things to say or do and then ending with things not to do or say, DON'T.

Laurel Amateur Radio Club Testing new hams since 1984 - still free of charge

THE SOUTHERN OHIO AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION (SOARA) IS NOW GIVING FREE HAM RADIO TEST (VOLUNTEER EXAMS)FOR NEW HAMS AND HAMS WHO WANT TO UPGRADE. TEST FOR TECHNICIAN, GENERAL, AND EXTRA CLASS LICENSE.

Read this and learn how you can get your FCC Ham Radio license right here in Lawrence County, Ohio. The Southern Ohio Amateur Radio Association (SOARA) – Amateur Radio Emergency Service ARES is giving free Volunteer Examiner (VE) testing. This is being done through the Laurel Amateur Radio Club. Our meetings are the third Monday of every month except November at 7:00 P. M. This is located in the rear room of EMA, 515 Park Ave., Ironton. The ham radio test session will be at 6:00 P.M. before our SOARA meeting starts. SOARA – ARES members Jerry Lockhart, W8HIC and Eddie Jenkins, N8URU are the VE leaders. The test question is multiple choice. I have heard more than one person state they can pass any multiple choice test. No Morse code required now. Remember the testing process is free. If you fail the test you may immediately take one over. All hams and interested people are welcome to attend our meetings.

There are now three classes of ham radio license. Beginners go for the Technician Class, a simple test with 35 multiple-choice questions from a pool of questions and answers. You need to answer 26 questions correctly. The test covers basic regulations, operating practices, and electrical and electronics theory. You will study and memorize these questions and answers. To get a General Class license, you must pass another 35-question test, the Amateur Extra Class test has 50 questions. To understand the meaning of these questions, look on the internet and purchase for a small price textbooks that explain these questions. This may help you pass the tests.

Amateur Radio (ham radio) has been around for over 100 years. The United States government began licensing Amateur Radio operators in 1912. For many years the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) required anyone wanting a ham radio license to take the test before an FCC examiner. Our nearest testing location with the FCC was Charleston, WV, and Columbus, OH. The examiner was there every three months. We studied textbooks about electronics and ham radio, we knew the tests would be on these subjects but would not know the questions until the test. Also, we were required to send and receive Morse code to the examiner.

Over the years the testing has drastically changed many times. Morse code is no longer required. You can receive a list of the questions to study for the test along with the answers that will be used for testing. You no longer are required to go before the FCC for your test. The test can now be administered by authorized local Volunteer ham radio Examiners. Jerry Lockhart, W8HIC and Eddie Jenkins, N8URU are our Volunteer Examiner leaders. If you are interested in getting a ham radio license with your own call letters please call Eddie Jenkins at 740 534 2390 or 740 533 4375 for information. You can see him and pick up your test papers to study at the EMA office, 515 Park Ave., Ironton, OH. At present, there are 35 questions given for the Technician Class exam. You have to get 26 questions correct to pass. These questions are taken from a pool of about 300 - 400 questions. If you are licensed and want to upgrade, Eddie has test papers with questions and answers for all three classes of Amateur Radio. When you are ready to take the test, come on down, walk-ins are welcome.

There are now three classes of Amateur Radio License. The Technician license with all privileges above 50 MHz, limited CW, Phone, and Data privileges below 30 MHz. This is the starting license after you get this you can upgrade to the General or Extra class license which will give you more operating privileges. The Technician license is on the Very High Frequency (VHF) bands.

General class license has all the Technician privileges plus most amateur High Frequency (HF) bands.

Amateur Extra class license has all amateur privileges. Small exclusive sub-bands are added on 80, 40, 20, and 15 meter bands.

BELOW FIND INFORMATION ON HAM RADIO PAST AND PRESENT

The newest trend in American communication isn't another smartphone from Apple or Google Ham radio licenses are at an all-time high, with over 700,000 licenses in the United States, according to the Federal Communications Commission. Amateur Radio is a great hobby, you can communicate with fellow hams all over the world. There are many contests that you can participate in one of many is Worked All States. If you can communicate with a ham in each state and get a QSL (confirmed contact) from the station then you can send this to The American Radio Relay League and receive a certificate showing you have had contact with all 50 states. There are many more contests. Some hams join a group (there are many) on the air, they have a time, date, and frequency to meet for an hour or so and chat. (called rag chew on ham). Sometimes the group will have an eyeball gathering with activities in one of our states. There are many nets at different times that you can join and check into. There is so much that can be done on ham radio to list here.

We have listed a very small part of the hobby section of ham radio. Now let's touch on the serious part of ham radio.


Many hams have a ham radio license so they can help their communities during emergencies. Weather related emergencies such as tornados, hurricanes, flooding, lighting, can cause power failures and loss of communication. Hams have AC and DC operated gear, some have generators. The repeaters hams use have backup generators. When all other communications including phones and cell phones fail, ham radio can communicate. During an emergency, hams are needed at the scene, shelters, fire stations, local red cross stations, law enforcement, 911/EMA, and many others. Several of the local National Weather forecasters are hams.

Each year SOARA - ARES has 20 or more hams helping provide communications for the Memorial Day Parade. Also communications in the Christmas Parade. We can provide communications for runs like 5K run and other activities in our communities needing communications. Ham radio is very much needed for many things in our communities, we need more hams to help.

Many of our astronauts are ham radio operators. Amateur Radio is used as a backup for the Space Station communicating with Houston, Cape Canaveral, and other needed locations. Their normal communications have failed more than once and they used ham radio. Part of their training is an optional Amateur Radio licensing class. Once licensed and in space, these astronauts can use Amateur Radio to communicate with people here on Earth. Hams with the proper equipment may be able to schedule a contact with the space station when it is passing over your location.

When a person is considering getting a ham license they usually ask how much is it going to cost. How much money do you have in your rat hole? You can spend on ham radio gear what you can afford. To help with the above-mentioned emergencies a two-meter hand-held transceiver can be very useful. You can purchase a new one for anywhere from $40.00 to $400.00. The higher the price the more bells included. Used ham radio gear is available at hamfest, just be sure it is in working condition. A hamfest is a flea market for electronic gear. You would need a Technician license to operate. With a 5 watt hand-held, the range of coverage depending on the terrain could be up to 15 - 20 air miles. By using one of SOARA - ARES repeaters your coverage could be up to 40 - 50 air miles. With your Technician license, you can upgrade to the General class license, get the required gear and communicate around the world and much more. After you receive your Technician license we would appreciate you joining SOARA - ARES. We have no dues and the use of our repeaters is free. We only ask that you help with our activities and help during emergencies.

DO YOU WANT TO BE A GOOD HAM RADIO OPERATOR?

DO

Read the following, first suggestions on what to DO, followed by a listing of what not to do. -- DON'T

► Exercise politeness regardless of the circumstances. Whenever you begin to feel that you can't, then stop transmitting.

► Be a good example especially for newly licensed Hams as well as short wave listeners who may be thinking about becoming a ham.

► Be a good listener. It will help you better organize your thoughts before transmitting.

► Reply to a CQ, or call CQ yourself. It is and always should be a major ingredient in the magic of ham radio.

► Speak clearly and slowly, especially when giving your call sign to someone you have never worked before.

► Promote friendship and goodwill to DX contacts. Look for ways to get to know each other rather than simply exchanging signal reports and 73s!

► Try to keep track of everyone in the QSO. Hopefully, someone has assumed the role of "traffic director" to make sure everyone has a chance to contribute to the discussion. If not, don't hesitate to do it yourself.

► Make it clear at the end of each transmission which station is expected to transmit next. Try to do this even when operating VOX.

► Operate on frequencies that are in whole kHz (e.g. 18.130Khz). This alleviates ambiguity and makes it easier for everyone to be on the same frequency.

► Openly praise other hams when you observe them doing something that you feel is especially deserving. e.g., helping demo ham radio to a group of scouts.

► Always be ready to quickly and calmly respond to emergency situations. Rehearse what you would do if presented with various scenarios.

► Operate in keeping with good amateur practice. Be certain to always comply with the provisions of Part 97 of the rules.

► Pause between transmissions. "Quick keying" gives the appearance that other hams are unwelcome in your QSO.

► Consider using the Internet to enrich your QSO. Avail yourself of the opportunity to add additional information and photos to your qrz.com page. You may also want to consider developing your own comprehensive personal website.

► Respect the privileges of hams operating in other modes on the HF bands including those who enjoy AM.

► Make a point to try 17 and 60 meters. Good practices are especially prevalent.

► Look for opportunities to "Elmer" newly licensed hams when you hear them on the HF bands. Welcome them, solicit their questions and give them pointers on good operating practices.

► Remember that no one country can proclaim to be the leader of the Amateur Radio world. Likewise, no one country's foreign policy is any more right or wrong than that of another country. Let's always keep this in mind when operating on the ham bands.

► Talking politics is generally considered to be in poor taste on the ham bands. However, if you are willing to courteously listen to the opinions of others while not insisting that you're right and their wrong, then you may want to do it. Just be careful to not offend others, especially if they are in another country.

► Develop good operating practices. You will be doing your part in helping insure the continuance of our long and proud tradition of self-regulation. Moreover, you just might convince someone else to also become a ham.

DON'T

Below are suggestions of things you don't do to be a great ham radio operator.

► Coughing, sneezing or clearing your throat into your microphone.

► Operating VOX when it may potentially tend to foster "quick keying" as it may tend to give the appearance that you don't welcome breakers.

► Becoming a "Band Policeman" quick to tell others what you feel they are doing wrong.  In instances where it may be called for, always be polite and constructive.

► Turning up your microphone gain or resort to excessive speech processing in order to be heard.  Such practices will most likely result in diminished audio quality and increased likelihood of interference (IMD) to nearby QSOs.

► Using the word "break" when wanting to join an on-going QSO.   Simply give your call sign between transmissions and reserve use of the word "break" for more urgent situations. If a ham has an emergency and wants to break into a QSO, he should say break 3 times. (BREAK, BREAK, BREAK.)

► Joining an ongoing QSO unless you have something to contribute to the discussion.  Try not to interrupt  other hams with a  request  for audio checks,  signal reports, etc.

► Knowingly interfere with an ongoing QSO just because you are working DX especially split frequency.   Working DX is great fun but should never assume to assume to include special operating privileges.

► Saying that the frequency is not in use if you hear someone ask if the frequency you are listening to is in use.  You should only respond if you know that the frequency or one nearby is in use.

► Ridiculing other hams or express any negative views of the overall state of Amateur Radio.  If you don't have something positive and constructive to say, don't say anything at all. ► Hiding behind your microphone.  Don't say anything over the air to someone that you wouldn't say face to face.

  Any questions ask one of our members or e-mail Ken Massie, WN8F at wn8f@arrl.net

THIS IS THE END OF THIS SECTION OF THE PAGE ABOUT "DO YOU WANT A HAM RADIO LICENSE.

ABOUT HAM RADIO

Amateur radio often called ham radio, is both a hobby and a service in which participants, called "hams," use various types of radio communications equipment to communicate with other radio amateurs for public service, recreation, and self-training.[1] Amateur radio operators enjoy personal (and often worldwide) wireless communications with each other and are able to support their communities with emergency and disaster communications if necessary while increasing their personal knowledge of electronics and radio theory. An estimated six million people throughout the world are regularly involved with amateur radio.[2] The term "amateur" is not a reflection on the skills of the participants, which are often quite advanced; rather, "amateur" indicates that amateur communications are not allowed to be made for commercial or money-making purposes.

Amateur (Ham) Radio Frequency Table

This information is presented for people that are NOT hams, or amateur radio operators, that want to know something about the frequencies that hams are legally allowed to use. Hams are required to know this in order to get an amateur license, or ticket as a license is called, to operate a transmitter.

MORSE CODE IS NO LONGER REQUIRED TO GET An FCC HAM RADIO LICENSE. However, hams who know Morse Code can and do still operate with CW (continuous wave) or Morse Code. At the present, there are three classes of license, TECHNICIAN, GENERAL, AND EXTRA being issued by the FCC.

It takes skill and patient determination to establish contact with another ham radio operator thousands of miles away, sometimes on the other side of the earth! Acquiring that skill of being able to overcome the often poor propagation conditions, not to mention man-made interference, with "amateur" equipment (often modified military or commercial surplus equipment), has and will continue to motivate a certain type of individual.

If you are interested in getting an FCC license come to the Southern Ohio Amateur Radio Association (SOARA) -- Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) meetings the third Monday of every month and we will help you. The meetings are at 7:00 P.M. and held in the rear room of the 911/EMA building, 515 Park Ave., Ironton, OH. All hams and interested people are welcome.

US Amateur Radio Bands Allocations

160 METERS General Advanced Extra CW, RTTY, Data, SSB(Phone), Image 1.800- 2.000 Mhz Amateur station operating at 1.900-2.000 Mhz must not cause harmful interference to the radiolocation service and are afforded no protection from radiolocation operations. Considerate Operator's Frequency Guide 1.800-1.830 CW, data, and other narrow band modes. 1.810 QRP CW calling frequency. 1.830-1.840 CW, data, and other narrow band modes, intercontinental QSOs only. 1.840-1.850 CW; SSB, SSTV and other wideband modes, intercontinental QSOs only 1.850-2.000 CW; phone, SSTV, and other wideband modes 1.910 QRP SSB calling frequency.

80 METERS Novice Tech w/5wpm CW Only 3.675 - 3.725 Mhz General CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 3.525 - 3.750 Mhz 3.850 - 4.000 Mhz Advanced CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 3.525 - 3.750 Mhz 3.775 - 4.000 Mhz Extra CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 3.500 - 3.750 Mhz 3.750 - 4.000 Mhz 5.167.5 Mhz (SSB Only): Alaska emergency use only. Considerate Operator's Frequency Guide 3.560 QRP CW calling frequency. 3.590 RTTY DX. 3.580-3.620 Data. 3.620-3.635 Automatically controlled data stations. 3.710 QRP Novice/Technician CW calling frequency. 3.790-3.800 DX window. 3.845 SSTV. 3.885 AM calling frequency. 3.985 QRP SSB calling frequency.

40 METERS Novice Tech w/5wpm CW Only 7.100 - 7.150 Mhz General* CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 7.025 - 7.150 Mhz 7.225 - 7.300 Mhz Advanced* CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 7.025 - 7.150 Mhz 7.150 - 7.300 Mhz Extra* CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 7.000 - 7.150 Mhz 7.150 - 7.300 Mhz * Phone operation is allowed on 7.025 - 7.100 Mhz in Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands and areas of the Caribbean south of 20° north latitude; and in Hawaii and areas near ITU Region 3, including Alaska. Considerate Operator's Frequency Guide 7.040 RTTY DX; QRP CW calling frequency. 7.080-7.100 Data. 7.100-7.105 Automatically controlled data stations. 7.110 QRP Novice/Technician CW calling frequency. 7.171 SSTV. 7.285 QRP SSB calling frequency. 7.290 AM calling frequency.

30 METERS General CW, RTTY, Data 10.100 - 10.150 Mhz Advanced CW, RTTY, Data 10.100 - 10.150 Mhz Extra CW, RTTY, Data 10.100 - 10.150 Mhz Maximum power on 30 meters is 200 watts PEP output. Amateurs must avoid interference to the fixed service outside the US. Considerate Operator's Frequency Guide 10.106 QRP CW calling frequency. 10.130-10.140 Data. 10.140-10.150 Automatically controlled data stations.

20 METERS General CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 14.025 - 14.150 Mhz 14.225 - 14.350 Mhz Advanced CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 14.025 - 14.150 Mhz 14.175 - 14.350 Mhz Extra CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 14.000 - 14.150 Mhz 14.150 - 14.350 Mhz Considerate Operator's Frequency Guide 14.060 QRP CW calling frequency. 14.070-14.095 Data. 14.095-14.0995 Automatically controlled data stations. 14.100 NCDXF/IARU beacons. 14.100-14.112 Automatically controlled data stations. 14.230 SSTV. 14.285 QRP SSB calling frequency. 14.286 AM calling frequency.

17 METERS General Advanced Extra CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 18.068 - 18.110 Mhz 18.110 - 18.168 Mhz Considerate Operator's Frequency Guide 18.100-18.105 Data. 18.105-18.110Automatically controlled data stations.

15 METERS Novice Tech w/5wpm CW Only 21.100 - 21.200 Mhz General CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 21.025 - 21.200 Mhz 21.300 - 21.450 Mhz Advanced CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 21.025 - 21.200 Mhz 21.225 - 21.450 Mhz Extra CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 21.000 - 21.200 Mhz 21.200 - 21.450 Mhz Considerate Operator's Frequency Guide 21.060 QRP CW calling frequency. 21.070-21.100 Data. 21.090-21.100 Automatically controlled data stations. 21.340 SSTV. 21.385 QRP SSB calling frequency.

12 METERS General Advanced Extra CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 24.890 - 24.930 Mhz 24.930 - 24.990 Mhz Considerate Operator's Frequency Guide 24.920-24.925 Data. 24.925-24.930 Automatically controlled data stations.

10 METERS Novice Tech w/5wpm CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW 28.100 - 28.300 Mhz 28.300 - 28.500 Mhz General Advanced Extra CW, RTTY, Data SSB(Phone), CW, Image 28.000 - 28.300 Mhz 28.300 - 29.700 Mhz Novices and Technicians are limited to 200 watts PEP output on 10 meters. Considerate Operator's Frequency Guide 28.060 QRP CW calling frequency. 28.070-28.120 Data. 28.120-28.189 Automatically controlled data stations. 28.190-28.225 Beacons. 28.385 QRP SSB calling frequency. 28.680 SSTV. 29.000-29.200 AM. 29.300-29.510 Satellite downlinks. 29.520-29.580 Repeater inputs. 29.600 FM simplex. 29.620-29.680 Repeater outputs.

6 METERS Novice Tech w/5wpm Tech No Code General Advanced Extra CW, RTTY, Data, MCW, Test, SSB(Phone), Image CW Only 50.1 - 55.0 Mhz 50.0 - 50.1 Mhz

2 METERS Novice Tech w/5wpm Tech No Code General Advanced Extra CW, RTTY, Data, MCW, Test, SSB(Phone), Image CW Only 144.1 - 148.0 Mhz 144.0 - 144.1 Mhz 1.25 METERS Novice Tech w/5wpm Tech No Code General Advanced Extra CW, RTTY, Data, MCW, Test, SSB(Phone), Image 222.0 - 225.0 Mhz Novices are limited to 25 watts PEP output from 222 to 225 Mhz.

70 CENTIMETERS Novice Tech w/5wpm Tech No Code General Advanced Extra CW, RTTY, Data, MCW, Test, SSB(Phone), Image 420.0 - 450.0 Mhz Updated 8.12.11

INTERFERENCE TO HAM RADIO FROM OTHER STATIONS AND CAUSES.

Interference to Ham Radio should be reported to the FCC at 1-888-225-5322.

Amateur radio complaints should be as specific as possible, citing dates, times, and frequencies on which alleged violations occurred. Complaints should also include a name and telephone number where the complainant can be reached for further details, if necessary. Please submit your complaints/concerns regarding amateur radio to the Commission's on-line complaint system. The appropriate form for your ...complaint can be found here: https://esupport.fcc.gov/ccmsforms/form2000.action…

Willful or Malicious Interference Complaints Section 97.101(d) of the Commission's Rules prohibits amateur operators from willfully or maliciously interfering with or causing interference to any radio communication or signal. 47 C.F.R. § 97.101(d). The Spectrum Enforcement Division, in conjunction with the Regional and Field Offices, is responsible for responding to complaints of willful and/or malicious interference (sometimes called ``jamming'') among amateur radio service licensees. Amateur radio service licensees wishing to file complaints alleging willful and/or malicious interference to other amateur radio service operations should follow the complaint process discussed above. Parties desiring further information may call: 1-888-225-5322

IARU WEBSITE MORE FREQUENCIES

HAM RADIO SEARCH.

This HAM RADIO SEARCH Website is a very interesting site with free ham radio information. Check your signal and listen to others on remote receivers. Read thousands of pages of ham radio information. Download virus-free radio-related design programs. There is no charge for receiver usage, any of the information, or any downloaded computer programs. Menus take you to major content sections. Thousands of other pages are buried within. Search from the bottom of any page to find what you are looking for if you don't see it in a menu. This site is updated frequently, so be sure to Bookmark or add it to your Favorites so you can return easily. (Don't lose track of this site, because some things here can be difficult to find anywhere else!)

65 Great Things About Ham Radio
Five years ago, on CQ's 60th anniversary, we ran a feature throughout the year titled "60 Great Things About Ham Radio," in which we listed five "great things" each month. The series was quite popular and we have continued to receive requests to reprint it. So now, in honor of our 65th anniversary, we're repeating the list—with a few updates as well as five more "Great Things About Ham Radio."

1. It works when nothing else does

2. It makes you part of a worldwide community

3. The opportunity to help neighbors by providing public service and emergency communications

4. Some of the nicest people you'll ever meet

5. Some of the smartest people you'll ever meet

6. Some of the most interesting people you'll ever meet

7. Some of the most generous people you'll ever meet (along with some of the cheapest!)

8. Lifelong friendships

9. Friends around the world (including those you haven't met yet)

10. The opportunity to go interesting places you might not otherwise go to

11. The opportunity to do interesting things you might not otherwise get to do

12. The opportunity to expand your knowledge of geography

13. The opportunity to expand your knowledge of earth and space science

14. Practical uses for high school math

15. Practical uses for high school physics

16. A good way to practice a foreign language

17. A good way to keep in touch with faraway friends and relatives

18. A good way to get driving directions when visiting someplace new (with or without GPS)

19. A good way to find the best places to eat when visiting someplace new (with or without GPS)

20. Finding "non-touristy" off-the-beaten-path places to stay, eat, visit, etc.

21. A good way to learn about virtually any topic

23. A good way to keep tabs on elderly/infirm people

24. People named Joe (Walsh, Rudi, Taylor)

25. How many of your non-ham friends have actually talked

to someone in some remote place such as Cape Verde or the Seychelles?

26. How many of your non-ham friends might have talked to an astronaut aboard the space station?

27. How many of your non-ham neighbors might have a satellite uplink station in their basements—or in the palms of their hands?

28. How many of your non-ham neighbors might have a TV studio in their garage?

29. What other hobby group has designed, built, and had launched its own fleet of communication satellites?

30. Where else can you play with meteors?

31. Moonbounce

32. Informal way to improve technical skills

33. Informal way to improve communication skills

34. Introduces a variety of career paths

35. Offers unparalleled opportunities for career networking

36. Opportunities for competition in contesting and foxhunting

37. A good way to collect really cool postcards from around the world (despite the growth of electronic confirmations)

38. Nearly endless variety of different things to do, on and off the air

39. Hamfests

40. Dayton

41. Field Day

42. Working DX

43. Being DX

44. DXpeditions

45. Contesting

46. Award-chasing

47. Double-hop sporadic-E

48. Worldwide DX on 6 meters (once or twice every 11 years) [The current extended sunspot minimum has shown that mechanisms other than F2 propagation can offer intercontinental DX on the "magic band" at any point in the solar cycle.]

49. Tropospheric ducting

50. Gray-line propagation

51. TEP, chordal hops, etc.

52. Getting through on CW when nothing else will

53. Unexpected band openings

54. Building your own gear

55. Using gear you've built yourself

56. Operating QRP from some remote location

57. Experimenting with antennas

58. Working DX while mobile or while hiking

59. Experimenting with new modes and new technology

60. The opportunity to help build the internet that doesn't rely on the internet

61. DXing on your HT via IRLP and Echolink

62. Contributing to scientific knowledge about propagation

63. Keeping track of other people's GPS units via APRS

64. Ham radio balloon launches to the edge of space, and as always...

65. Reading CQ!

Permission is hereby granted to reprint this list in amateur radio club newsletters, provided credit is given to CQ magazine. Online editions must include a link to the CQ website, http://www.cq-amateur-radio.com.

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