*WHY HAM RADIO IS STILL MAKING NEWS

*SOUTHERN OHIO AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION WEBSITE W8SOE.COM

*KIDS CAN TALK TO SANTA VIA HAM RADIO

*DO YOU WANT TO BE A HAM RADIO OPERATOR

*GREAT HAM RADIO OPERATOR

*NET PREAMBLE AND MORE

*AMERICAN LEGION HAM RADIO CLUB UPDATED NOV 2018

*HOW SOARA-ARES WAS STARTED

*OPERATING YOUR HAM RADIO

*SILENT KEYS

*HOME

CHECK CALENDAR FOR EVENTS

<

Ohio Valley ARES/RACES Net Every Thursday at 8:30 P.M. Repeater 146.610, alternate repeater is 146.715 both repeaters have tones of 103.5. Check both repeaters to find the net.


NEXT SOARA -- ARES MEETING WILL BE THE THIRD MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH. EMA ROOM 515 PARK AVE IRONTON OH. AT 7:00 P.M. VE TESTING AT 6:00 P.M.

December 2018
SMTWTFS
      1
2345678
9101112 131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031

Click Here for Full Calendar

SOARA -- ARES MEMBERS

PIO & Webmaster WN8F OK to e-mai me l from here:
Ken Massie
N8TVO:
James Rowe
K8UHN:
Eric Kuhn
N8LRO:
Arthur J. Pierson
W8AFX:
Steve Sheers
N8LCA:
Bill Parsons
KC8WDR:
Harry Rice
KC8VYE:
Chad Thompson
KD8FPX:
Joseph Thompson
KD8FPW:
Mary Thompson
WA4SWF:
Fred Jones
KI4AGR:
Don Canterberry
WW8O:
Gary Stephenson
WM8O:
Wanda Stephenson
W8GMS:
Georgia Sheers
KC8WDS:
Catherine Rice
WN8H:
Mike Nimmo
W8DUQ:
Gregory Hendry
KB9ORD:
Ralph Tuley
WB8YKS:
Mike Love
KB8GWL:
Larry Jewell
N8YN:
Jerry Huffman
KD8LEQ:
Pat Little
KB8RZP:
Gregory Priddy
KE4US:
Bud Preece
KD8NYN:
David Bruce
KD8OMC:
Angie Little
W8HIC:
Jerry Lockhart
KD8RRZ:
Kenny Fields, Jr.
AC8JV:
Matthew Delong
AC8RS:
Matt Marks
AC8VQ:
Tim Nicely
KD8VRU:
Randy Franz
KK4PPJ:
James Miller
KD8WFP:
James (Jay) Boggs
KD8WMV:
Richard (Corey) Watson
KB8LWZ:
Mike (David) Barber
KB8LSR:
Jim Perry
WD8AGH:
Fred Herr
N8URU:
Eddie Jenkins
KB8TGI:
Annabelle Jenkins
N4REN:
James (REN) Reneau
KB8AAK:
RUSSELL JETT
KE8DYD:
LARRY MURRAY, JR
KE8EON:
JIM CURLEY
KC4GST:
Darrell Short
N8DKB:
Keith Brooks
KK4SPW:
Larry Jackson
KE8FSY:
Richard Russell
KM4ZXC:
Christopher Wilson
N8PSA:
Randy Friend

LINKS TO GREAT SITES


target=_blank>QRZ HAM CALL LOOKUP


HF NET LISTING


Ham Radio Information

Ham Radio Information

Ham Radio Information

photos 2016 field day

Ohio Education/Libraries

OHIO EMA

OHIO WEATHER SAFETY

Ohio Gov Localities




ARRL OHIO

Amateur Radio Emergency Service - Ohio Section

District Eight of the Ohio Section

RIVER CITIES ARA

Tri State Amateur Radio Association

HAM CALL LOOKUP AND MORE

WORLD RADIO

LINKS TO OUR AREA AGENCIES

E HAM

EAGLE ANTENNAS BY W8AFX

Big Sandy KY ARC

CLUBS IN 8TH CALL DISTRICT

ARRL GREAT LAKES DIVISION

WORLD WIDE HAMCALL CALL SIGN SERVER

Scanner Frequencies for Lawrence County, OH

CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN OHIO UHF NETWORK

OHIO REPEATER COUNCIL

ALL ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO MOBILE OPERATION AND MUCH

Repeaters in Ohio

ARRL HELLO RADIO

60 GREAT THINGS ABOUT HAM RADIO

Gallia - Mason County, OH ARES

Jackson County OH Amateur Radio Club

W8OSP GOOD LOCAL HAM RADIO INFORMATION

American Legion Post 433

HAM TEST ON LINE

One touck tech

SOARA FACEBOOK

Scioto County, OH ARES

LAW CO OH EMA

OHIO HAM RADIO OPERATORS

SOARA ON TWITTER

img
SOUTHERN OHIO AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION WEBSITE W8SOE.COM


img
Click here to edit your pageClick here to go to your office

This Southern Ohio Amateur Radio Association (SOARA) website http://w8soe.org/ has a huge amount of up-to-date SOARA ham radio information. Please visit these sites often for latest updates.

http://w8soe.org/

http://www.orgsites.com/oh/soaraares/

https://www.hamqth.com/W8SOE

https://www.facebook.com/hamwn8f/

This site has many good photos:

https://www.facebook.com/lawrenceohioares/

RECENT POSTS on w8soe.org

New TRI-State Area DMR Repeater Provided John Davis KB8TGK

First Aid, CPR and AED Training ARES / SOARA October 27, 2018 Ironton, Ohio

DMR Training Class November 10, 2018

Cabell / Wayne West Virginia LEPC Full-Scale Exercise October 13, 2018

Family of Hurricane Michael One of Our Own “Hams Helping Hams”

SOARA Members Elect 2019 Officers

National Weather Service Training October 16, 2018 Ashland, KY

CATEGORIES

Community Service

Meetings

Parade

Repeaters

Special Events

Training

Uncategorized

====================================================================================

MORE ABOUT FRED FROM AN E MAIL I RECEIVED FROM HIM.

I got into radio when I was 12 years old mainly listening to shortwave made a logbook of the stations I would hear each day and got conformation cards from most of them. I would write them letters and to save money to afford the stamps to mail them. I still have most the cards and my logs on them to. Charles Hager he had television shop here for years and I worried him to death. As I got older I would cut his grass and stuff, he was just great to me he was in WWII would tell me stories about what he did. I got to drive his car when I got my license and loved it. Had spot light on it big pull out antenna, it is still here in this town now. The kids in school use to call me Radio Head, some of my teachers would say at times to me well I see the “DJ” made it to school on time, Disc Jockey as I would try to talk like them when I read off something in my class.

HONORING FRED JONES, WA4SWF, AMATEUR (HAM) RADIO, LOUISA, KY.


FRED WITH ONE OF HIS MANY CERTIFICATES

THE GREATEST HAM RADIO OPERATOR -- FRED JONES, WA4SWF

Fred Jones knew the International Morse Code Alphabet before he graduated from high school. Today, he's 74 and still finds the system of dots and dashes quite entertaining for communication as a licensed HAM Radio operator in Louisa, Kentucky. As a teenager, he developed an interest in the hobby when he began hanging out at Compton's Fix It Shop in Louisa.

"Mr. Compton always seemed busy fixing things in his shop," said Jones. "He could weld anything back together; he repaired appliances, fixed lawnmowers and even built HAM Radios. More than that, he was a great individual who taught me how to build radio receivers and transmitters; he even showed me how to construct antennas. He had quite an elaborate HAM Radio setup in his house and my first visit to his well-equipped radio room had me committed to be a licensed HAM Radio operator with my own station."

Jones was born in Riverview Hospital, Louisa, Kentucky, in 1944. He had two brothers and a sister. His sister Anna was 12 years older; his brother Charles was ten years older. There was only about one year's difference in age between him and his brother Bill.

"Dad worked for the C&O Railway on a construction gang that traveled," said Jones. "He was gone during the week, that left a lot of work for Bill and I."

Some of the things these two brothers were expected to take care of were: mowing the lawn, taking care of the big garden out back, helping their mom make deliveries of clothes that were washed and ironed for other families, visits to the grocery store and above all - staying up with all homework assignments.

"Our garden was a lot bigger before the by-pass came through out back and nearly cut our garden in half," said Jones. "Bill and I received a quarter for our weekly allowance. On Saturdays we'd go to the Louisa Movie house for the kid's matinee. Fifteen cents admission, for a dime you got a box of candy and a coke. Because we were colored Bill and I sat in the balcony to watch the movie. The irony of it all was the visibility was better up there and most of our white friends would come sit with us. The projectionist was George Hardwick and you could sometimes hear his frustration when he had to change the hot carbon lighting rods in the projectors."

Making clothing deliveries to families that his mother washed and ironed for was no easy process for Fred and his brother Bill. They each pulled a wagon stacked with clothing where they'd place paper between orders. The slightest fragment of dirt or stain that occurred on the way to delivery met everything had to be done over.

"Colored kids were allowed visits to Camden Park one day a year," said Jones. "If dad was working that day or for some reason we couldn't make it, we'd wait until next year. Swimming pools weren't a problem for me because I never cared for swimming. We did have different neighborhood baseball teams that played during the summer, there was never any color barriers with us kids. The only fuss about color was with the adults.

Between their mother doing house work for families and dad's job at the railway, they managed well. Dad drove an old 1940 two door Chrysler Royal. Their mother got the most out of the boys clothing by patching jeans on the sewing machine.

"There was an African-American Church on Boone Street that we attended once a month," said Jones. "The preacher would arrive on the train with his wife who played the organ. Each visit a different family would invite the preacher and his wife for dinner after service."

Halloween met trick or treat in the rich neighborhood where chocolate bars were passed out. Thanksgiving was always across town to Grandmother Jones who was the absolute best cook in town.

"Granny Jones had two cook stoves in her kitchen," said Jones. "Her meals were so terrific she even cooked for several families around town. She even raised and prepared chickens for dinner right in her back yard."

Jones says his best Christmas present ever was an American Flyer passenger train set that he enjoyed for several years.

"Our mother home-schooled Bill and me for the first and second grade," said Jones. "By the time we were ready for the third grade the city had fixed up a building that bill and I attended for two years. A colored lady came from Ashland to teach us. By the fifth grade we attended Louisa Elementary, on the first day all our white friends wondered why we didn't attend sooner.

"The only problem was lunch on the first day. The lady in the serving line was afraid to serve us for fear of losing her job. Bill and I went back to our room and the principal brought us lunch with the assurance that by tomorrow things would be normal. After that there was never a problem."

Before Jones graduated from Louisa High School in 1963 he had already passed the examination for his HAM Radio License. His father helped him get started but the majority of his expenses for this hobby were paid by working as an evening radio police dispatcher for the Louisa police department on Saturdays. He also delivered groceries for Louisa Cut Rate Supermarket using his bicycle. After he passed his driver's exam, he drove the 1951 Chevrolet store delivery truck.

"Louisa, Kentucky is a beautiful friendly town," said Jones. "I still live in the house I was raised in. I retired from Armco Steel after 31 years and I'm still active with my HAM Radio operation. I wouldn't think of living anywhere else."

Jones has radio call sign cards from fellow HAM Operators in every continent, most countries and every state. He maintains membership in radio clubs in Ironton, Paintsville and Louisa. He was director of Louisa's Civil Defense for twelve years during the 1960s and 70s. Now day's breakfast is followed by checking around the country to see how many of his friends are still signing on. Evenings he has a network of friends who communicate strictly by using the language of the International Morse Code. It's a language that Jones says in falling by the wayside in lieu of cell phones. But within his circle of friends it's still a great way to share time with those in faraway places.

Note from SOARA Editor: Clyde Beal does such a great job of doing this type of stories. Find his stories in the Herald - Dispatch each Sunday.

Clyde Beal seeks out interesting stories from folks around the Tri-State. Email archie350@frontier.com.

Fred Jones, WA4SWF has been one of my best friends for close to 60 years. We both were CB operators when CBers had to have a FCC License before we became hams.

He has held positions in many ham radio clubs. Fred has a record of receiving more certificates and plaques for his good deeds in ham radio.

Fred is also a member of the ARRL and an Assistant Great Lakes Division Manager. Fred is known by amateur radio operators across the tri-state area and beyond. He has been and continues to be a friend, mentor, elmer, supporter, to the hobby of Amateur Radio. Fred has been instrumental in developing HAM clubs in Kentucky and Amateur Radio Emergency Service groups. Fred has served on countless committees in support of amateur radio. Additionally, he has served local government in many capacities in particular working closely with the Emergency Management Agency. Fred is truly an ambassador for Amateur Radio in all capacities.


 
755 Visitors  WHY HAM RADIO IS STILL MAKING NEWS

| SOUTHERN OHIO AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION WEBSITE W8SOE.COM

| KIDS CAN TALK TO SANTA VIA HAM RADIO

| DO YOU WANT TO BE A HAM RADIO OPERATOR

| GREAT HAM RADIO OPERATOR

| NET PREAMBLE AND MORE


AMERICAN LEGION HAM RADIO CLUB UPDATED NOV 2018

| HOW SOARA-ARES WAS STARTED

| OPERATING YOUR HAM RADIO

| SILENT KEYS

| HOME | WRITE US


TOP