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Ohio Valley ARES/RACES Net Every Thursday at 8:30 P.M. Repeater 146.610, alternate repeater is 146.715 both repeaters have tones of 103.5.


SOARA -- ARES WILL MEET AT 7:00 P.M. ON MONDAY, AUGUST 18, 2014. MEETING IN THE REAR ROOM OF 911/EMA, 515 PARK AVE., IRONTON. ALL HAMS AND INTERESTED PEOPLE ARE WELCOME.

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Tri-State two meter net meets daily Mon - Fri at 7:30 P.M. on repeater 146.940 tone 107.2



August 2014
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Click Here for Full Calendar

SOARA -- ARES MEMBERS

PIO & Webmaster WN8F OK to e-mai me l from here:
Ken Massie
N8TVO:
James Rowe
K8UHN:
Eric Kuhn
N8LRO:
Arthur J. Pierson
KD8CRX:
David Spears
W8AFX:
Steve Sheers
N8LCA:
Bill Parsons
KC8WDR:
Harry Rice
KC8VYE:
Chad Thompson
KD8FPX:
Joseph Thompson
KD8FPW:
Mary Thompson
WA4SWF:
Fred Jones
KI4AGR:
Don Canterberry
WW8O:
Gary Stephenson
WM8O:
Wanda Stephenson
W8GMS:
Georgia Sheers
KC8WDS:
Catherine Rice
WN8H:
Mike Nimmo
W8DUQ:
Gregory Hendry
KB9ORD:
Ralph Tuley
WB8YKS:
Mike Love
KB8GWL:
Larry Jewell
N8YN:
Jerry Huffman
KD8LAT:
Boyd Little
KD8LEQ:
Pat Little
KD8ELD:
Bernard Nance
KB8RZP:
Gregory Priddy
KE4US:
Bud Preece
WA8GTQ:
Richard Jones
KD8NYN:
David Bruce
KD8OMC:
Angie Little
W8HTC:
Jerry Lockhart
N4TNA:
Chris Straiton
KD8RRZ:
Kenny Fields, Jr.
AC8JV:
Matthew Delong
KD8SZG:
Matt Marks
KD8VKD:
Tim Nicely
KD8VRU:
Randy Franz
KK4PPJ:
James Miller
KD8WFP:
James (Jay) Boggs
KD8WMV:
Richard (Corey) Watson
KB8LWZ:
Mike (David) Barber
KB8LSR:
Jim Perry
WD8AGH:
Fred Herr
KJ4LVY:
Joe Compton

LINKS TO GREAT SITES

QRZ HAM CALL LOOKUP

">QRZ HAM CALL LOOKUP


QRZ HAM CALL LOOKUP



ARRL OHIO

AMATEUR RADIO EMERGENCY SERVICE - OHIO SECTION

DISTRICT EIGHT OF THE OHIO SECTION

RIVER CITIES ARA

TRI STATE AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION

HAM CALL LOOKUP AND MORE

WORLD RADIO

LINKS TO OUR AREA AGENCIES

E HAM

EAGLE ANTENNAS BY W8AFX

BIG SANDY KY ARC

CLUBS IN 8TH CALL DISTRICT

ARRL GREAT LAKES DIVISION

WORLD WIDE HAMCALL CALL SIGN SERVER

SCANNER FREQUENCIES FOR LAWRENCE COUNTY, OH

CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN OHIO UHF NETWORK

OHIO REPEATER COUNCIL

ALL ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO MOBILE OPERATION AND MUCH

REPEATERS IN OHIO

ARRL HELLO RADIO

60 GREAT THINGS ABOUT HAM RADIO

GALLIA - MASON COUNTY, OH ARES

JACKSON COUNTY OH AMATEUR RADIO CLUB

W8OSP GOOD LOCAL HAM RADIO INFORMATION

AMERICAN LEGION POST 433

HAM TEST ON LINE

ONE TOUCK TECH

SOARA FACEBOOK

SCIOTO COUNTY, OH ARES

LAW CO OH EMA

OHIO HAM RADIO OPERATORS

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COMMUNICATIONS DURING EMERGENCIES AND IARU


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See IARU below

PROCEDURES OF COMMUNICATION OPERATIONS DURING EMERGENCIES


HELLO WORLD

THIS HAM RADIO STATION IS CAPABLE OF CALLING THE WORLD

All ARES members, and licensed amateurs, should immediately monitor the repeater frequency of (146.610 tones 103.5) in the event of a local emergency/disaster, or when the treat of severe weather for the area is imminent.

EMERGENCY NET

Upon being contacted by Lawrence County, OH Emergency Management, or other authority, a net is to be activated on the 146.610 (tones 103.5) local repeater. Should the repeater be down, our other repeater on 146.715 (tones 103.5) will be used if operative. An alternate frequency of 147.570 simplex will also be utilized, we do not need a repeater when using simplex, but stations have to be dispatched to shorter distances and may be used as relays. Additional net frequencies will be issued by the Net Control Station as necessary.

RACES (Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service) Nets can ONLY be activated for “Civil Emergencies” and only under the authority of the Lawrence County Emergency Management Director. ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Service) Operators will be used in most instances. (See: RACES below)

NET CONTROL

The Net Control Station is responsible for:

Opening the net on the primary net frequency, or alternate frequency. Maintaining order on the net. Assign stations and “tactical callsigns” to the specific locations requested by the incident commander/emergency management official. Maintain an up-to-date list of all stations and tactical callsigns assigned to the different locations. Maintain an up-to-date list of all radio amateurs checked into the net for availability. Assign relief operators at the assigned locations as needed.

TACTICAL CALLSIGNS

Tactical callsigns will be used in addition to the individual callsigns of the operators assigned to specific locations for official communication. These tactical callsigns will be assigned by the net control and will reflect the location/duties of the assigned operator. For example: KD8CRX might be assigned to operate the station at the Lawrence County Emergency Operations Center… and the tactical callsign would be “Lawrence County EOC.” The Net Control operator would use the tactical callsign “Net Control.” These would be used in addition to the Amateur Callsign required for legal identification every ten minutes. Our SOARA - ARES FCC Licensed Call is W8SOE.

RESPONDING OPERATORS

Registered Lawrence County ARES Operators may be dispatched to the several locations. It may be necessary to utilize volunteer operators who are not ARES/RACES members. However, registered ARES members will be used as “Primary” communicators. Lawrence County, OH Emergency Management Office (EOC), is located in the rear room of the 911/EMA building, 515 Park Ave., Ironton, OH. This may serve as the net control location or a traffic handling location. If the EOC is damaged, or if it is determined that a field EOC is required, ARES members will man that location. Boyd Little, KD8LAT is our Official Emergency Station (OES). He can operate from his home base station and pass traffic on the low bands to other sections of our state or out of the state if necessary. First United Methodist Church, 101 North 5th Street, Ironton, has been used as a primary shelter during a emergency/disaster. There are other shelters according to the Red Cross, which maintains shelter agreements with schools, churches and other locations in the county. Ham Radio Personnel will man the shelters for traffic handling. If other local agencies communications are down ARES operators may be required to cover for Sheriff, Patrol, EMS, EMA, Mayor, County Commissioner and others. The Lawrence County, OH Emergency Management Director may request an operator accompany them as needed. Other possible locations include, but are not limited to: Incident Command Center, Fire Station, local hospitals, National Guard, and Red Cross. This is not to be taken as a complete list of all agencies that may require our assistance with communications. This is only a guide of what our operators may expect to be called upon for service.

CONDUCT

In all instances, ARES/RACES operators are NOT to interfere with the business being handled by the entities we are supporting. When you arrive at an assigned location, notify the person in charge of that area that you are there and are ready to provide communications. Ask where would be the best place for you to locate, out of the way, but available when needed. Operators should check-in with Net Control when arriving at an assigned location and when being relieved by another operator or released by the person in charge of that area. Once regular communications are re-established, (if applicable) notify Net Control and inform the person in charge of that area that you are leaving if further assistance is not required. DO NOT leave your assigned area until relieved by a relief operator or until released by the person in charge of that area, or re-assigned or relieved of your duties by Net Control. Inform Net Control when you are once again available for further assistance. Operators are to adhere to all applicable FCC rules and regulations, including keeping a written record of all third party traffic handled. Remember, we are only to provide communications where normal means do not exist or are overloaded

What is RACES?

RACES (Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service), administered by local, county and state emergency management agencies, and supported by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) of the United States government. It is a part of the Amateur Radio Service that provides radio communications for civil-preparedness purposes only, during periods of local, regional or national civil emergencies. These emergencies are not limited to war-related activities, but can include natural disasters such as fires, floods and earthquakes. As defined in the rules, RACES is a radiocommunication service, conducted by volunteer licensed amateurs, designed to provide emergency communications to local or state civil-preparedness agencies. It is important to note that RACES operation is authorized by emergency management officials only, and this operation is strictly limited to official civil-preparedness activity in the event of an emergency-communications situation.




INTERNATIONAL AMATEUR RADIO UNION (IARU) -- ESTABLISHED 1925

AMATEUR RADIO "THE GREATEST OF ALL SCIENTIFIC HOBBIES" As we strive to be better operators it would improve your ham radio operating procedures if you would go to the IARU webpage and download their loads of great information.

The IARU is a international organization for ham radio.

IARU Region 1: Europe, Africa, Middle East and North Africa.

IARU Region 2: The Americas - North, Central, and South.

IARU Region 3: Asia and Pacific.

Go to the IARU link below and click, once there download the ethics and operating procedure for the Radio Amateur (edition 3) - 2011. Excellent information. Also visit other links on the IARU homepage

IARU




DURING EMERGENCIES WHEN ALL ELSE FAILS AMATEUR RADIO CAN COMMUNICATE.

ALSO A GREAT HOBBY.


HAM AT BASE STATION

Amateur Radio sometimes called Ham Radio has been in operation for over 100 years. During this period many changes have taken place.

Ham Radio is a great hobby, and can be used for emergency communications during emergencies and disasters. Also used for other activities in our communities.

Amateur radio (ham radio) is the licensed and private use of designated radio bands, for purposes of private recreation, non-commercial exchange of messages, experimentation, self-training, and emergency communication. Amateur radio, like other regulated radio services, operates under rules that limit the maximum power and the technical and operational characteristics of transmissions. Amateur radio stations are issued with a designated call sign to allow identification of stations. The power of amateur radio equipment is restricted, and operators must not cause interference to other authorized radio users. They may not broadcast to or communicate with the public with their equipment. They are only allowed to communicate with other licensed operators. National regulations governing amateur radio use are coordinated under international agreements since radio frequency transmissions can cross multiple national boundaries.

The term "amateur" is used to differentiate it from commercial and professional two-way radio services. Amateur radio operation is licensed by national governments. Amateur radio operation rules are coordinated by the International Telecommunication Union. An estimated two million people throughout the world are regularly involved with amateur radio. History Although its origins can be traced to the late 19th century, amateur radio, as practiced today, did not begin until the early 20th century. The first listing of amateur radio stations is contained in the First Annual Official Wireless Blue Book of the Wireless Association of America in 1909. This first radio callbook lists wireless telegraph stations in Canada and the United States, including 89 amateur radio stations. As with radio in general, the birth of amateur radio was strongly associated with various amateur experimenters and hobbyists. Throughout its history, amateur radio enthusiasts have made significant contributions to science, engineering, industry, and social services. Research by amateur radio operators has founded new industries, built economies, empowered nations, and saved lives in times of emergency.

Some of the worse disasters are weather related, earthquakes, floods, tornados, hurricanes, and wet roads that cause vehicle accidents. Over the many years, hams have provided emergency communications to their communities. They have worked with other agencies, Emergency Management, law enforcement, fire, EMS, Red Cross, Salvation Army, child search programs and others. During emergencies hams have passed messages we call health and welfare messages from families at shelters to other families and agencies. If necessary messages can be sent to almost anywhere in the country. Hams have passed messages for our military personnel both in the U.S., overseas, and ships at sea to their families at home. Many hams have phone patch capability and can allow the families and military personnel to talk via ham radio patched into the phone lines. Hams have provided communications for parades, runs, walks, and other community activities. Since 1989 hams have provided necessary communications for the 12 divisions of the local Memorial Day Parade. Communications are needed for getting help for accidents, fire and law requests, and other needs to and from the activity directors.

Many of these helpful programs have been provided in our Lawrence County, OH and the Tri-State area. Several years ago local hams had a club and helped provide emergency communications when Civil Defense Agency was in force. Early 1990 many local hams joined a new local ham radio club, SOUTHERN OHIO AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION. (SOARA). Also AMATEUR RADIO EMERGENCY SERVICE, (ARES) and are members of our national organization, AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAQUE, headquarters in Newington, CT. In 1993 during a snow and ice storm hams had the only way of communication. The National Guard was called in, they had no means of communication, hams were assigned to each humvee with their own ham radio and antenna. None of the court house employees could get to work, hams set up a control ham station in the court house and at the Sheriff's headquarters. A humvee with ham radio operator had to be sent to the Kitts Hill area to bring commissioner George Patterson to the court house to sign and have the county declared an emergency county. Phone service was out for some time because the phones were overloaded. Prescriptions, kerosene, and other necessary supplies were deliverd by humvee with ham radio providing communications. Hams communicated on the 2 meter ham band and through their repeater which had generator power.

Over the last several years many means of communcations have changed. In the hobby part, some hams still use a hand key or a bug (automatic keyer) to send Morse code. Of course voice is used and the single side band mode is the mode most used. On our base stations hams can communicate with other hams all over the worrld. Others use computers and have gone digital with the many interfaces that are available. Packet radio, Echo, communications via satellites, repeaters,are only some of the newer means. Hams can still build their antennas but many new commercial antennas are available for purchase. The FCC allows licensed Hams to use many bands and frequencies. Hams use their base stations, antennas, and related gear to communicate distances like anywhere in the U.S and most anywhere in the world. For local emergency communications and other local projects hams use mostly the 2 meter band which gives them about 20 mile coverage. They also have 3 repeaters in Lawrence County, OH and when going through a repeater on 2 meters can have coverage up to 100 air miles on the two meter band. In the Emergency Communications field hams are still able and available to help. Through grants from Home Land Security and others, many agencies have gone to a newer way of communicating. It is the MULTI AGENCY RADIO COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM (MARCS). This is expensive to purchase and maintain. It allows all agencies to communicate with any other agency who has MARCS installed. They can communicate over a much greater distance. Under normal conditions and during a minor emergency, hams may no longer be needed to provide emergency communications. During a major disaster or emergency MARCS has many problems, their frequencies become overloaded due to so many agencies attempting to use it at one time. This was true during the Katrina and other major disasters throughout the country during the last several years. In these types of disasters ham radio has been used and when all else fails ham radio can communicate. Hams purchase their own equipment which can add up to several thousand dollars. The local repeaters they have and use are purchased through donations collected from merchants, individuals, hams, fund raising projects, and local agencies. At the present time over seven thousand dollars worth of repeaters have been purchased by local hams and are mostly for local communication emergencies. Bellfonte hospital recently purchased and installed a ham staion near their emergency room to be used by our local hams to provide communications during disasters and emergencies. Hams are trained and have several plans of good operating procedures and equipment to provide emergency communications to our communities.


Ham Radio Operator using digital communications


 
2216 Visitors  WW II VETERAN AND HAM RADIO OPERATOR

| REPEATER PROBLEMS - - SOARA PRESIDENT - - OUR NET PREAMBLE

| PHOTOS OF HAM COMMUNICATORS 2014 MEMORIAL DAY PARADE

| PATRIOTIC HAMS HELPING 2014 MEMORIAL DAY PARADE

| COMMUNICATIONS DURING EMERGENCIES AND IARU

| HAM RADIO FREQUENCIES AND INFORMATION PLUS RDF


HAM RADIO GO KIT- TURN OUT BAG. PLUS AMERICAN LEGION HAM RADIO

| OPERATING TIPS

| WE CAN HELP YOU GET A HAM RADIO LICENSE

| OUR SILENT KEYS

| HOME  


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