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Afrikan American Festival Committee

ALTON BLACKLEY CHAIRMAN

Jenever Brown

Larry Gibson

Randy Gnatowsky

Octavia C. Judge

Calvin Pearson

Beverly T. Penn

Jacqueline Sydnor

Johnnie Tidwell

Casey Peoples

Yvonne Bailey

Hakiim Fountaine

Major R. V. Davis

Gloria Malone

SCAP BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jenever Brown,President

Mary Tyner,Vice President

Jacqueline Sydnor, Secretary

Alton Blackley,Treasurer

Directors

Dr. Mary Christian

Lenora Boyd

Mary Bryant

Lana Smith

Johnnie Tidwell

Larry Gibson

Clarence J. Joyner

Octavia C. Judge

Beverly T. Penn

Randy Gnatowsky

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Johnnie Tidwell

July 2014
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"Live Well with Sickle Cell"


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SICKLE CELL ASSOCIATION

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img s.gifSICKLE CELL ASSOCIATION OF THE PENINSULA (SCAP)

Formally known as Peninsula Association For Sickle Cell Anemia (PASCA)

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inheritance2.jpgIMPORTANT SICKLE CELL FACTS    
    Sickle Cell is an inherited disorder of the red blood cells.
    Over 1 million people are affected worldwide.
    IT IS NOT A BLACK DISEASE.
    People of Italian, Greek, Caribbean, Hispanic, Indian, Saudi Arabian, African and African American decent are affected.
    PEOPLE WITH SICKLE CELL TRAIT CAN HAVE PAIN EPISODES
    PAIN is the main problem with this disease but all organs and tissues are damaged by this life-long illness
    Hemoglobin Electrophoresis is the most accurate blood test to determine if you have sickle cell disease or sickle cell trait.
    THE SICKLE DEX TEST IS AN INADEQUATE TEST!!!
    If you need additional information, please send us an email via the "contact us" section in the lower right hand corner of this page.
 
Amazing Run For Sickle Cell 2012 

Our Amazing Run for Sickle Cell 2012 was an adventure in itself this year. Just like last year, we had rain and wind on the original run date. Actually, a tornado touched down in the exact place we were supposed to start riding. After rescheduling the ride, it was still cold and rainy...we had people come from the peninsula to ride with us! Originally, we had members from the Harlem, Brooklyn, Bronx and Atlanta chapters of the Wild Aces, ride on two's from their respective areas, to support this cause!!! Their dedication warmed the coordinators heart but it was disappointing that they had to ride back to their respective homes without the opportunity to ride for this great cause.

The AMAZING RUN FOR SICKLE CELL was an event to raise awareness of sickle cell and to raise money for a scholarship for a rising high school senior in our service area. Last years scholarship was awarded to Briana Lawrence. She is currently adjusting to university life at Virginia Union University.

We would like to thank the Afro Dogs MC, Euro Knightz MC,Final Destination MC and Wild Aces MC for their participation in the Amazing Run for Sickle Cell 2012.

TROPHIES AWARDED

Most Money Donated
    Wild Aces MC - Virginia Beach Chapter
Most Registered
    Final Destination MC
Furthest Distance Travelled
    Wild Aces MC - Atlanta Chapter

In addition, we would like to thank Lee Anderson of Aggressor Custom Cycles for having a staging area for this event. We would like to thank him for the popcorn and the warm smile we received upon arrival. Finally, thank you to everyone who wanted to participate in the run but was unable.

 
FACEBOOK

WE ARE ON FACEBOOK!

Please check out our Facebook page at Peninsula Association for Sickle Cell Anemia. You can click on the link, "Facebook" on the lower left side of this page. Please "Like" us on Facebook. In addition, we would like you to check out our Causes page on Facebook at CELLebrate Life and Support Sickle Cell Anemia. The website can be found on this pages link,"Make A Donation".

Thank you for liking us and for adding us as your friend. Please tell a friend about our page.

ALL DONATIONS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE
 
 

AFRIKAN AMERICAN FESTIVAL

MILL POINT PARK - HAMPTON

June 28-30, 2013


We know you have been waiting so, here it goes...the 2013 dates for the festival are June 28th - June 30th...

Applications are available by calling the office at 757-813-1021 or by making a request by email to sicklecellofthepeninsula@yahoo.com

Donations are requested as this is our biggest fundraiser of the year.

We would like to thank you in advance for your participation...we know you will not be disappointed!!!

 
 

Center For Disease Control: Sickle Cell Disease: 10 Things You Need to Know

How much do you know about sickle cell disease? Read below to find out 10 things you need to know about one of the most common genetic diseases in the United States.

1. Did you know that African Americans are not the only people who get sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease affects millions of people throughout the world and is particularly common among people whose ancestors come from sub-Saharan Africa, Spanish-speaking regions in the Western Hemisphere (South America, Cuba, and Central America), Saudi Arabia, India, and Mediterranean countries such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy. Because of this, hospitals in the United States screen all newborn babies for sickle cell disease.

2. Did you know that it's important to know whether or not you have sickle cell trait? People with sickle cell trait usually do not have any of the symptoms of the disease.However, it is possible for a person with sickle cell trait to have complications of the disease under extreme conditions, such as:

• High altitude (flying, mountain climbing, or cities with a high altitude)

• Increased pressure (scuba diving)

• Low oxygen (mountain climbing or exercising extremely hard, such as in military boot camp or when training for an athletic competition)

• Dehydration (too little water in the body)

In addition, a person with sickle cell trait can pass the disease on to their children.

3. Did you know that people with sickle cell trait are less likely to get malaria? People with sickle cell disease can get malaria just like anyone else. However, people with sickle cell trait are less likely to get malaria. The trait doesn't completely protect a person from infection, but it makes death from malaria less likely.

4. Did you know that a pain “episode” or “crisis” is the most common symptom of sickle cell disease and the top reason that people with the disease go to the emergency room or hospital? When sickle cells travel through small blood vessels, they can get stuck and clog the blood flow. This causes pain that can start suddenly, be mild to severe, and last for any length of time.

5. Did you know that a woman with sickle cell disease can have a healthy pregnancy? Women with sickle cell disease can have a healthy pregnancy, but need to be extra careful to avoid problems during pregnancy that can affect their own health and the health of the unborn baby. The disease may become more severe and pain episodes may occur more frequently. There is a higher risk of preterm labor and of having a low-birthweight baby. However, with early prenatal care and careful monitoring throughout pregnancy, women with sickle cell disease can have a healthy pregnancy. During pregnancy, there is a test to find out if the unborn baby will have sickle cell disease, sickle cell trait, or neither one. The test is usually conducted after the second month of pregnancy. Women with sickle cell disease might want to see a genetic counselor to find information about the disease and the chances that sickle cell disease will be passed to the baby.

6. Did you know that there are different types of sickle cell disease? There are several different types of sickle cell disease. People who inherit two sickle cell genes, one from each parent, have a type of sickle cell disease called SS. This is commonly called “sickle cell anemia” and is usually the most severe form of the disease. People who inherit a sickle cell gene from one parent and a gene for another type of abnormal hemoglobin (hemoglobin is a protein that allows red blood cells to carry oxygen to all parts of the body) from the other parent, have a different type of sickle cell disease. Some types of sickle cell disease are very severe and some are milder. The disease affects each person differently.

7. Did you know that there is a cure for sickle cell disease? Even though bone marrow/stem cell transplant is hailed as a cure for sickle cell, there is no universal cure! Bone marrow is a soft, fatty tissue inside the center of the bones where blood cells are made. A bone marrow/stem cell transplant is a procedure that takes healthy cells that form blood from one person - the donor - and puts them into someone whose bone marrow is not working properly. Bone marrow/stem cell transplants are very risky, and can have serious side effects, including death. For the transplant to work, the bone marrow must be a close match. Usually, the best donor is a brother or sister. Bone marrow/stem cell transplants are used only in cases of severe sickle cell disease for children who have minimal organ damage from the disease.

8. Did you know that people with sickle cell disease need to have their vision checked more often that people who do not have sickle cell disease? Vision loss, including blindness, can occur when blood vessels in the eye become blocked with sickle cells and the retina (the thin layer of tissue inside the back of the eye) gets damaged. People with sickle cell disease should have their eyes checked every year to look for damage to the retina. If possible, this should be done by an eye doctor who specializes in diseases of the retina. If the retina is damaged, laser treatment often can prevent further vision loss.

9. Did you know that there are a lot of things that a person with sickle cell disease can do to avoid some of the complications?

People with sickle cell disease can live full lives and enjoy most of the activities that other people do. There are things that people with sickle cell disease can do to stay as healthy as possible. Here a few examples:

• Get regular checkups. Regular health checkups with a primary care doctor can help prevent some serious problems.

• Prevent infections. Common illnesses, like the flu, can quickly become dangerous for a child with sickle cell disease. The best defense is to take simple steps to help prevent infections. See tips to help prevent getting an infection.

• Learn healthy habits. People with sickle cell disease should drink 8 to 10 glasses of water every day and eat healthy food. They also should try not to get too hot, too cold, or too tired.

• Look for clinical studies. New clinical research studies are happening all the time to find better treatments and, hopefully, a cure for sickle cell disease. People who participate in these studies might have access to new medicines and treatment options.

• Get support. Find a patient support group or community-based organization in your area that can provide information, assistance, and support.

10. Did you know that people with sickle cell disease should get vaccinations? People with sickle cell disease, especially infants and children, are more at risk for harmful infections. Pneumonia is a leading cause of death in infants and young children with sickle cell disease. Vaccinations can protect against harmful infections.


 
 SICKLE CELL ASSOCIATION OF THE PENINSULA (SCAP)FORMALLY KNOWN AS PENINSULA ASSOCIATION FOR SICKLE CELL ANEMIA (PASCA)
512 E. Mercury Blvd.  •  Hampton, VA 23663
phone: 757-813-1021

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